Saturday, February 19, 2011

Musée Rodin - Paris, France

Musée Rodin From the garden - Paris, France
Musée Rodin From the garden - Paris, France

Musée Rodin was one of the museums we visited during our stay in Paris. The museum displays the works of the French sculptor Auguste Rodin and is home to a number of the Artist most famous pieces. These include the Thinker, the Kisser and the Gates of hell. The gardens surrounding the museum are also full of Rodin's sculptors and a restaurant.

More images and info after the jump.

The entrance to Musée Rodin - Paris, France
The entrance to Musée Rodin - Paris, France

There were a number of people in the museum when we got there so it wasn't possible to get a photograph of the building without people getting in the frame. I was actually surprised by the fact that the museums in France allowed visitors to take pictures at all. I had the polariser on while I was photographing the exteriors of the museum but because it was around mid day it wasn't too effective.

The Thinker, Musée Roddin - Paris, France
The Thinker, Musée Roddin - Paris, France

The sculpture title "The Thinker" is probably one of Rodin's most famous pieces. It is placed in the garden just inside the entrance to the museum. I was able to get a clear shot of the statue as it sits on top of a 8 foot concrete stand.

The Musée Rodin - Paris, France
The Musée Rodin - Paris, France

The museum was opened in 1919 in Hotel Biron which Rodin used as his workshop since 1908.  He donated his entire collection of sculptures and paintings from Vincent van Gough and Pierre-Suguste Renoir, to the French government on the condition that they convert the building into a museum dedicated to his works.

The Gates of Hell, Musée Rodin - Paris, France
The Gates of Hell, Musée Rodin - Paris, France

The gates of Hell, is one of Rodin's sculptural group work depicting "The Inferno" in Danté's Device Comedy. It contains 180 figures ranging from 15cm in height to over a meter. The project was meant to be delivered in 1885 (5 years after it was commissioned by the Directorate of Fine Arts) but Rodin worked on this project periodically for 37 years until his death in 1917.

All images on this post were captured with a Canon 7D and a 254-105mm lens. A circular polariser was also used.

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